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of the supreme court, certainly intellect, experience, obs vance of the rule of law and precedent. but the supreme court is the final word of what is the law of the land and so therefore i don't want to see more who say that discrimination against women and discrimination based on gender is not protected against under the constitution. when i go by the supreme court on my way to work every day over the mantle it says equal justice under law. it does not say equal justice for some people in america and not for others. and as it relates to row v. wade, i support that. i support a woman's right to choose. my opponent i don't know which view he has. last year he was prolife, now he's pro-choice. >> senator business and industry complain that the 2010 fair act will be expensive and cut into profits and slow the economic recovery. how do you respond to critics who argue that the economic burden of implementing this policy will wind up costing even more american jobs? >> first of all, the reality is what did he have before the law, double premium increases, unsustainable for a family who
might have evidence that jesus christ had a wife. last week, a law professor who happens to be running for national office, was still defending her american indian ancestry. in fact, the liberal professor, elizabeth warren, has been talking about this since last spring, when the issue came up during her campaign to unseat senator scott brown, a republican. miss warren is a star in the democratic universe, a new and improved hillary clinton. perhaps even a presidential candidate, they say. she spent time as an adviser to president obam abut as the story goes, the republicans and even perhaps a few democrats ran her out of town. senator brown, if you haven't been paying attention, won his traditionally democratic seat in a special election after the death of senator ted kennedy, a tipoff to the white house that trouble lurk in the land of hope and change. so this is an extremely critical election for both parties as they fight to control the u.s. senate. it is a wonder that senator brown won an election in the people's republic of massachusetts t. might even take a miracle for him to hol
work hard, you can be whatever you want to be. when i was going to law school, i couldn't afford t. my grandmother at 75 years of age, cleaned housed to get me there. i am so blessed. i want to take that same dream and make is that your future generations have the same access that i had. believe me, i love this country. this country has been great. but we have to make sure that we protect the future. we contact have a $16 trillion deficit for the future. we cannot have the greatest tax hike in american history. we must work to bring jobs back to america and we have to do it the right way. but the most important -- i'm sorry. >> shannon: we have to leave it there. we are out of time. vernon parker -- >> visit my web site. visit vernonparker.com. we stand for restoring the american dream. god bless you all. >> shannon: thank you. fair and balanced. in the next hour, we'll hear from vernon parker's opponent. and we will ask her about charges that she is too extreme to representative arizona. many of the justices attended a special mass here in washington today. coming up, we will take a l
believe fundamentally in a man or woman's right to protest? >> translator: yes. it depends on the laws of any nation. all nations' laws are not equal. they differ. in most countries in one way or another this is allowed under the laws. but fundamentally, i do agree, certainly people must be allowed to express their own opinions freely. freedom is part of the essential rights of all nations. no one has the right to take that away. >> if that is the case, why has the daughter of the former president of iran been imprisoned for protesting against your regime? >> in iran there's only one regime so perhaps they're protesting against that. and if iran the judicial branch is not under the power of the government, of the administration. they have their own laws, and that's what they follow. and we have no interference in that. and the government has paved the way for the highest form of freedom for all people, and you see that comfortably people criticize, people sometimes trespass the borderlines of proper protest, and they insult one another. as a president, i'm in the middle of the people o
usually ignore it, as todd knows. we passed a law last year that limited the size of the budget for two years. it actually says in the law, if you go to mccaskill. senate.gov. you can read it. we want to keep that spending down. this is a political talking points and it's unfair one. >> it time for our next question. will come from jeff fox go first to congressman todd akin. >> eimated 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 everyday. that has dramatic effects on medicare. what is the best approach to put medicare on a permanently secure financial footing? >> putting medicare on a firm financial footing is going to first of all, involve repealing obamacare. look, let's take a look at what obamacare does to medire. first thing it does is it cuts $700 billion out of medicare. it's pretty hard to say you're in favor of medicare and cut 7er hundred billion dollars out of it. let's take a look at the second thing it does which is even worse. creates a 15 person board that will effectively be the people deciding who gets medical treatment and who doesn't. this is rationing. this is government rationing.
in the nation. we pass the combating autism into law, critical for those families. iran is a national security threat to the united states and allies in israel. i joined at the republican senator from illinois was passed in most crippling sanctions by one company against another and got a 100 [cheers and applause] zero vote in the united states senate, something you don't see too often. working with republican senator, chair of the housing subcommittee, we pass into law doubling housing. those are three of many examples i can. for i have worked with republican senators on the other site to make a difference for new jersey families. talking about bipartisan all-time, 90% of these those durand line with his party in the state legislature. every time his colleagues want to seek an override, he has never found once an opportunity to join them and say no. >> moderator: michael aron at the next question to senator menendez. >> senator menendez can the team to snipe at each other all the time. you seem to have a chilly relationship with governor christie dating back to 2006 when you were the target o
feingold. and so, look, i'm going to -- what you need to know about me is i will uphold the law, i'm going to have an attorney general that enforces the law. the time for campaign funding reform is after the election. this man has outspent me and the special interests are outspending me. and i am not going to lay down my arms in the middle of the campaign for somebody who has got no credibility on the issue. >> senator mccain -- hold on one second. senator mccain said in august, "it doesn't matter which one of you is president of the united states in january, there is going to be blood on the floor of the united states senate," and he'll tie up the senate until campaign finance reform is passed that includes a ban on soft money. first of all, would you support that effort by him, or would you sign a bill that is finally passed that included -- >> i would support an effort to ban corporate soft money and labor union soft money so long as there was dues check-off. sinceampaigned on this the primaries. i believe there needs to be instant disclosure on the internet as to who has given to who.
ahead, why is the obama administration telling companies to break the law? how can the president justify this? making matters worse, the president is promising to pay the legal bills of the companies breaking the law with, you guessed it, taxpayer money. this story is likely to unglue you. former governor haley barbour is outraged. he's here and next. also you must hear what these two men are saying. senator john mccain and governogovernor chris christie. could the obama secret weapon be used against them? a new twist that will you have talking. stick around. nnouncer ] how do u make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. droid does. and does it launch apps by voice while learning your voice ? launch cab4me. droid does. keep left at the fork. does it do turn-by-turn navigation ? droid does. with verizon, america's largest 4g lte network, and motorola, droid does.
to a suspicious fire at the private law office of vallejo mayor osby davis. christian is live on the building with a look at the damage and the investigation. christian. >> reporter: as you said, fire investigators are already saying this is a suspicious fire. now that the sun is rising we're getting a better look. you can see there's a lot of damage here. looking up you can see this is the office of osby davis. this is his private practice. looking inside the building you can see just how damaging this fire was. officials were inside just a couple of hours ago trying to figure out exactly how this fire started in the first place. crews responded to the fire here at about 1:30 this morning and say when they arrived, there was an intensifier and heavy smoke filling the building. and crews tell me they were able to confine that fire to the waiting room area but also say there's extensive smoke damage throughout the building. mayor0 bee davis was here early earlier this morning as his law office burned, as was michael thompson, the attorney who shares this office space. firefighters say the fire
in the united states they have to meet the requirements of many different countries laws, and sometimes it is difficult to become a supplier to a high brand-name a anchor tenant because they don't want to have their brand integrity challenge door product challenge and they are trying to deliver the best product at the best point possible to get more market share and global dominance. so when we talk of a trusted suppliers that one set of suppliers and that's another set of getting into the to process these are both very important. >> dennis was speaking from mississippi in case you couldn't tell from my accent. when you're eating cat fish you don't know if it came from the delta or the vietnam. the food source is truly global but with extending that to deny what you just a little bit further we do have the food and drug administration, the united states department of agriculture regulations, and so to extend your analogy is there a role for regulation in cyberspace? what are the proper roles as melissa mentioned the policy levers to read this is to each of the panelists. >> as i said at
see. here with it is cnn's kyon law. >>> dinner time means family time at the skillman household, from who is chopping to who's stirring. to who's sitting around the table and who soon won't. how hard is this for your family? >> not real sure. i don't think it's hit them yet. i really don't. >> reporter: a grandfather to three girls, his other title is master sergeant dan skillman, u.s. army reserves. he deploys to afghanistan in weeks, with his wife, master sergeant lola skillman and their oldest son, james, a sergeant. husband, wife, and son will be gone nine months as reserve support at kandahar. despite the 29 years that lola served, this will be her first time deployed to a war zone. are you scared at all? >> yes. some people say no, they're not scared, they're ready to go do this. but i think in the back of everybody's mind it is a little bit terrifying. >> reporter: at the skillman home where the unpaved road meets a montana big sky, they know about sacrifice for country. lola's father was awarded the purple heart during world war ii. dan's father joined the national guard. dan
, that's what we did. [applause] the new health care law helps make sure you don't have to worry about going broke just because you or a loved one gets sick. insurance companies can no longer put lifetime limits on your care. or jack up your premiums without reason. or drop your coverage when you need it most. they can no longer discriminate against children with pre-existing conditions. and soon they will no longer be able to deny you coverage based on pre-existing conditions like breast cancer or charge you more for the same care just because you're a woman. this law has already allowed nearly seven million young adults under the age of 26 to sign up and stay on their parents' health care plan. it's already saved millions of seniors on medicare hundreds of dollars on their prescription medicine. and millions of americans have actually gotten a rebate from their insurance company if that company -- you got one? [applause] i wanted to say -- i mean, she was a supporter. but i didn't know about -- [laughter] you get a rebate if the insurance company spent too much on demitch costs and c
. defying the laws of history, we did just that. we gathered the exiles. we store our -- restored our independence and rebuild our life. the jewish people have come home. we will never be uprooted again. [applause] yom kippur.as your income f we have come together on this day of reflection and atonement. we take stock of our past. we pray for our future. we remembered are persecution -- our persecution. we remember the great travails of our dispersion. we mourn the extermination of 6 million people in the holocaust. but at the end of this holiday, we celebrate the birth of israel. we celebrate the terrorism of our young men and women who defended -- heroism of our younn and women who defended israel. in israel, we walk the same paths tried by abraham and jacob. we blaze new trails in science, technology, medicine, agriculture. in israel, the past and the future find common ground. unfortunately, that is not the case in many other countries. today, a great battle is being waged between the modern and the medieval. the forces of maternity seek a bright future -- modernity seek a bright
of the president's national drug control policy. he brings 37 years of law enforcement and drug policy experience to the position. most recently, prior to coming to washington, he was the chief of police in seattle, washington. and prior to that, he was a deputy director for the united states department of justice office of community policing services. r. gil kerlikowske. [applause] >> good morning. thank you. i would also like pam hyde to pam, and the samhsa team. it is a real partnership and has been for well over three years. national survey on drug use and health provides the important markers but we need to measure ourselves and our work by. it tells us what is working. but it also reminds us of what we have got to do an order to keep our nation healthy. before i discuss the data being released today, i wanted to provide a bit of a perspective of this administration's approach to drug policy. and since my conformation and 2009, we have repeatedly affirmed that we are not waging a war on drugs. as a bumper sticker is totally inappropriate and it does not anywhere near reflected the approach w
has just enumerated, but also because the world has changed around us. in part because the laws our policy. we spent an awful lot of time, effort and money after world war ii creating an international system, economic system in particular to stimulate the growth in the rest of the world. so, this is the success of the policy of several decades that has made us relatively less strong in terms of disposable cash and disposable incentives to get to the behavior that we want to see. militarily, we surely are as strong as we have ever been, but we live in a world that has a number of nuclear powers and we still live in the world before 1957 that had not. so, other than us. you know, to me it hardly even seems worth debating this is a different world. >> i was told we have to debate. [inaudible] the decline is the wrong word. i think the world is getting more crowded. they are growing faster and in economic terms the u.s. will have the west shared wealth for the years ahead but there isn't a country by the way that is as jessica said that is a story of american success. it's for 60 years
international order that upholds the rule of law, of open access to all domains, and of the peaceful resolution of disputes. we seek a peaceful asia-pacific region where all the states of the region, all of them, can enjoy the benefits of security and continue to prosper just as they have for almost 70 years, since the valiant efforts of the brave men and women who fought so courageously in world war ii. indeed, part of the reason states in the region have been able to prosper has been due to our military presence. thanks to that historic security, states in the region have had the freedom to choose and forge their own economic and political futures. the stability provided an important measure by the united states military presence in the region helped, first, japan and south korea to rise and prosper, then southeast asia to rise and prosper, and now, yes, china and in a different way, india, to rise and prosper. working with all of them, we intend to continue to play that positive, pivotal stabilizing role. that's what the rebalance is all about. to those who ask whether we'll be able to deliv
beaten to death. was written cabin" very much as a protest novel to the fugitive a state law or anyone in the north, including new england, with the abolitionists and -- if anyone in the northwest to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fine for breaking the law. this was seen as a compromise between the north and south to avoid war. that was part of what the novel was trying to do, to say, listen, i am a person, harriet beecher stowe, and i'm against slavery, as was much of new england, and i just my right to call a slave who finds him or herself -- t.s. my right to help the slave who finds him or herself within our borders. >> more about it. beecher stowe this weekend as -- or about. beecher stowe this weekend as we look behind the history and literary history of augusta, maine. sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> almost 20 years ago, we broadcast one of the most controversial stories in our 44 years on the air. it was called "yes, but is it art?" at was accused of being a philistines, someone without the ability to appreciate con
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the law. um, and if you do that in this case, there is no reasonable justification for a continuation of the exclusivity ban. so i think, i think the chairman's order, um, as you describe it, um, is the appropriate course of action to take. um, you know, are -- and that's been comcast's position in the proceeding. um, life is long. as you note, our order lasts until 2018. um, and so for whatever it applies to over that period of time, it applies to. but after that period of time we should be treated like everybody else, um, and again if, um, if people believe that it is appropriate for the exclusivity ban to continue, they need to go back to congress and to get different legislation than the legislation that exists now. because the current legislation simply does not support the exclusivity ban in the current competitive positive -- posture of the marketplace. >> what happens when october 5th rolls around and it expires? do we suddenly see several exclusive contracts out there? >> guest: i don't think so. i think the fears have been overstated. i think that the marketplace now is such
to focus on the constitution and the rule of law because the legal framework is such that women are protected in the constitution in terms of their right. any move away from the rule of law, where trade was just as our ad hoc justices applied is bad for women. we have seen that in parts of afghanistan. the reality is that it's going to be pretty difficult for women in hearts of afghanistan because as you see in pakistan, pakistan does have the rule of law, an institution, but in the remote parts you can't always enforce it. and that is going to be the reality for a lot of women in parts of afghanistan. and i think we are pretty powerless to do much about that. but what we can try and do is try and make sure that women's rights are enshrined in the comp duchenne for interrogation from that and influence. we can use our influence because if we found the afghans come obvious they were going to make it conditional on things like corruption and human rights, on how women are treated. so we have this going to give the minister of finance to do the right thing. so i think we should use
laws, the ban on the xl pipeline, the enforcement of labor laws -- those policies have killed thousands and thousands of jobs and collectively, we are making it incredibly difficult for small businesses to drive, much less -- thrive, much less survive. >> so if you have 65% of spending going to individual payments, what would you do to try to reduce that? >> in order to create more jobs, we have to control the national debt. i think that is what we have to do. i have said it from the beginning. i have given a plan to try to deal with it. this idea that somehow mr. cruz is lecturing us on standing on our own feet, i find incredible. he spent most of your adult life working for the government. you have not created jobs. you have not on your own business. i have. my wife and i own a retail store. we did not have the federal government with their boots on our neck. when george bush was president, we lost 700,000 jobs per month. all these programs were in place at the time. the only addition is the health care act, which has not been fully implemented. i think that you have a selective memor
in federal court if bin laden was captured. the book said he felt dew processs and the rule of law would be the best weapon against al-qaida. >> gretchen: the world's largest generic drug maker pulling the drug antidepressant from a storage shelve. wellbuttrin. it doesn't work like it is supposed to. they found wharf it is. it released. okay it releases faster than the original drug in 2008. federal officials said the two were. now you know why i am not a pharmacist. >> brian: plus you hate the cotton balls. >> gretchen: i do. >> brian: how could a christian bible house not religious. they asked for a exemption of the controversial birth. tyndale house said the ma date violates the beliefs. he said 95 percent of the profits go to non. >> steve: it is the laziest invention ever. the hop and suitcase that follows you around. using the blue tooth signal on your cell phone. fine as long as someone doesn't use yourr cell phone. if it is lost, the bag locks itself and alert the owner's phone. the 28 year old who came up with the idea said it is not ready for the market. >> gretchen: looks like
in an industrial park. officers caught up with him and took him into custody. >>> some new driving laws take effect in maryland. starting today all children under the age of 8 must sit in a child seat or booster seat in the car. it does not matter how much they weigh. if the children are taller than 4' 9, they obviously don't have to. also you are now required by law to treat a dark traffic light as a stop sign. that will be key with the next round of power outages. if you don't, you could get a ticket. >>> no such thing as a tax free lunch anymore, at least not in the district. starting today d.c. food truck operators will be adding on a 10% tax on the meals they sell. that's the same tax charged in d.c. restaurants. before the new tax food truck operators paid the city a $1,500 flat rate every year. >>> you may not be familiar with his face, but you'll know his cartoon. coming up we'll introduce you to the host of this year's oscar. >> 50 years ago james meredith was admitted to the university of mississippi. i'm randall pinkston in oxford as ole miss marks a dramatic moment that changed the scho
spying. you have the law of the land in the united states. for the chinese, it is an attractive alternative. when you are on the other side of the trade and you know your competitor or the person you buy something from us under pressure financially, you should hold the card and send a card. so you just don't want to get to a point where the chinese say, look, we will do this, but we want much higher interest rates. so that is when race could spike, really impact the economy, be much costlier for average folks because rates will follow suit and will see a spiraling out of control now. so that is why you just don't want to have some other player having cars like that. in addition, you need economic growth in terms of raising revenue before this country. we are seeing growth contracts. that's okay, but it's just okay. it is not where we should meet in this kind of recovery, at this moment in the recovery based on typical recovery. next year as a result of going over the fiscal cliff and that of course is the expiration of the tax cuts to the spending programs for the most economist
by that is one of the reasons many of these voter i.d. laws were passed is they did not understand the implications on the state level. so many people were outraged with the trayvon martin killing, but the district attorney decided not to press charges was elected. most of the issues that affect people every day our local issues, but i believe that national organizations put so much emphasis on the top of the ticket they are ignoring vital state, gubernatorial, state, county commissioner, all those down-ballot races, and when you are talking about the military- industrial complex, those are district attorney's charging people, judge-citizens charging people, so speak to how you are educating your constituents to understand down-ballot races matter, and even more so, then the top of the ticket? >> it is also different states. if you complained about extremism in the republican party or the support by minorities of the democratic party, you self-gerrymander the country, counties, and districts. what is transpiring is you can make sure you -- but you are giving up on south carolina. t
know, martin luther king said the moral law of the universe bends slowly, but it bends towards justice. eng there was a bending towards justice. there are things wrong with the health care bill, but you know what johnson would have said? he said that about the civil rights bill, a flawed bill. he said the important thing is to pass it. once you pass it, it's easy to go back and fix it. >> host: next caller from georgia. good morning to you. >> caller: good morning. thank you for the distinguished work for us all. >> guest: thank you. >> caller: yes. i wonder if you came across things in your research that suggested president johnson experienced moral compunction about the behavior at some point. it's striking he's so on the spot with the angels with civil rights and other important issues, but so unscrupulous in accomplishing those wonderful goalsment thank you. >> guest: well, that's another really terrific question. you are talking about ends and means. the ends is noble. medicare, lyndon johnson said it's the job of government to take care of the bent and the ill. the bent means the
health care law last june. so how might mitt romney change the high court if he becomes president of the united states? he's already giving all of us some major clues. let's bring in cnn's crime and justice correspondent joe johns who's taking a closer look. what are you seeing? >> the supreme court doesn't get talked about that much on the campaign trail. but choosing a justice is one of the most important things a president does. it's how on administration puts its mark on some of the nation east toughest, most divisive issues. and we have a look at how mitt romney might handle it if he's president. whenever mitt romney fielded questions during the primaries about his picks for the supreme court, he was armed with a stock republican answer. >> what i would look to do would be to appoint people to the supreme court that will follow strictly the constitution as opposed to to legislating from the bench. >> reporter: but he wouldn't choose a favorite. >> would you pick one, please? >> yes, roberts, thomas, alito and scalia. >> reporter: all that changed in june when roberts cast the
to get a baby sitter lose days from worked -- work. law-enforcement, legal counseling services, all under one roof. >> somebody there will be able to help you, if it is free. >> domestic-abuse victims are helped by a new law allowing them to collect money if they have to leave, immediately. >> do not stay because you need a paycheck. >> there is an added, permanent feature to make all deal less traumatic -- make the whole deal less traumatic. >> making people feel more comfortable. >> they say it makes all of the difference. in rockville greta kreuz, abc 7 news. >> and that is on now for abc 7 news at 5:00. coming up at 6:00 -- >> attacking each other for months from a far -- from afar president obama at mitt romney debate. breaking into offices on capitol hill. wait until you hear what they are getting away with. i am horace holmes. >> life and in hd this is abc 7 news at 6:00, on your side -- live and in hd. >> president obama and mitt romney are now in denver. the president arrived just a short time ago. it is at the university of denver. with a range of domestic issues to discu
free. governor jerry brown giving the okay to a law that can release them. >> gregg: shocking numbers, u.s. airlines raked in $2 billion in baggage ties during the first half of the year. that the largest amount ever collected for a six-month period. this as a new report emerges finding passengers are facing more fees than ever before and fewer choices. how about that? anything consumers can do. ed joins us managing partner of investment firm. rise of oil prices make a corresponding rise in jet fuel and 30% of operating costs for the airlines. are the airlines trying to make up for it in other ways like the fees? >> sure. look this is great lesson in economics. it's supply and demand and competition. when there is less competition. usually the quality goes down and prices go up. that is exactly what is happening right now. we have fewer and fewer airlines out there. you have oil prices, gregg, any time oil prices are above $85 a barrel you have a hard time being profitable in the airline industry. >> gregg: that is the tipping point generally? >> it really is. so is this a sign of thi
ways to reduce the number of abortions. we got to think about why our law enforcement community --our working mothers are in trouble. we have to get free natal care for them. have too many children coming into kindergarten behind, and if we lose them in kindergarten, we lose them for ever. 2500 kids in a program here in omaha that are provided refuge that are being sexually abused in their own home. we got to pay attention to them, and we got to help them and the moms and the community leaders who are trying to help this problem. i do not think we should regulate women in making these decisions. it does not stop there. there is lots more that needs to make sure that that children have a fair and decent opportunity to live to their full potential. >> i am pro life. i believe in the sanctity of life. i believe there should be an exception made for the life of the mother. what we are looking at is an economy that is hurting families. we're looking at an economy that tends to hurt women more. the situation we're in the last four years, it is hurting women. women are not able to find jobs.
and brother-in-law. they live right over the border in boston. i do not know if that is a good or bad thing to everybody here. my sister lives in boston. she works for dunkin brands. this man knows how to balance a budget, cut spending, it knows fiscal responsibility. he is one of the leaders helping us to do that. that is charlie bass as well. let's give them a round of applause. [applause] friends, we have a big trees to make. -- we have a big choice to make. this is not your ordinary election. we are not just deciding who will be the next president for four years. we are deciding what kind of country we will have and what kind of people we will be for a generation. this is a high-stakes election. if we have four more years like the last four years, we continue stagnation. the choice is very clear. do we want a dynamic, growing economy that fosters opportunity or do we want a stagnant economy that fosters dependency? that is not who we are. we want to live free and prosper. we want to believe. [applause] when president obama came into office, he inherited a tough situation. the problem is
to himself. with that adjudication under federal law, it prohibits you from buying a gun, but in virginia 2007, those records are only sent to a background check if you are sent for inpatient therapy. cho was sent to outpatient therapy, so that connection with never made. instead of signing up for therapy, he went on the internet and bought some guns and ammunition and walked into this building a couple months after that and killed 32 people and himself. >> professor geobotany -- giovanni a few years before that threaten to leave if something was not done. >> to raise the flag of his peers, other people that live on the campus, students, why was he never dealt with appropriately, why was he not given help you so badly asking for? hindsight is 2020 in retrospect, but if you learn something, you have to change. you cannot let this same situation happened somewhere else. >> now, aurora massacre victims are coming to meet with you? >> yes, and it has happened again. obviously, a young person that should never have had guns in his hands in the first place. we will learn more about this particu
don't understand where that law came from, i thought a majority is anything that's above 50%, and i don't know where this 60% came from. maybe you could enlighten us on exactly the origin of that filibuster law. host: well, andy, that would take way too long for me to explain, but perhaps we'll do that as a segment on the "washington journal" and take our viewers and listeners through the intricacies of the rules of the house and senate. but thanks for your call. we're going to move on to ron on our line for democrats, calling from florida. good morning, ron. caller: good morning. host: ron, divided party -- one party or divided government? caller: well, that question is -- the underlying point is you're saying a -- in essence, what you're saying is a one-party state, and that just doesn't work. it was proved in the soviet union and the place where i immigrated from, which was cuba. the problem is, as someone said, this is not your father's republican party. when you have a new crop signing a pledge before they even take office that allows them no room to negotiate, on top of that,
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